Wild Packs – Headshots

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Last month I worked with a great company called Wild Packs, who are committed to getting kids from outside of the USA into US summer camps, to experience the profound benefits of the system. They’re pretty unique in that respect and by their very nature are full of fun and personality.

So it was exciting to be asked to come along to Crieff Hydro during a company retreat to do their portraits. It’s an important and oft underrated part of the business equation. In an increasingly impersonal online world, it’s vitally important to put forward your very human face.

That first impression really counts. You might be getting your business online, but whether it’s via LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, or your own website; people are still buying into you. So this stuff really matters, and as a photographer it’s an honour and a responsibility to be asked to help get it right.

The challenge with this kind of shoot is 3 fold: space available to shoot; time available to shoot and nervousness, pure and simple. Some people, understandably, get nervous in front of the camera, almost to “dentist” levels of fear.

In order to be ready for these challenges I make a point of having as much knowledge as I can. Knowing the people at the venue who can help, and knowing your options can make the difference between disaster and success on a shoot. Pre-shoot preparation, should be pretty invisible to the client, but if it’s not done, the job gets so much harder.

I’ve also worked hard at being flexible. I don’t need a studio, and you’d be surprised at the results I can get in some pretty small spaces. At the Hydro, I only had access to a small client liaison room, in order to do the shoot, yet the results, in my humble opinion are “studio” quality. In my opinion, studios are not necessary for most modern portraiture. As a client, you need not take excessive time out of your day to get business portraiture done. The photographer should come to you, I know I certainly can.

Also the photographer should be aware of how valuable your time is, and how much of it you’re willing or able to give. In this instance, I had a morning, to set up and do portraits for the whole company. As it turned out, due to preparing well and having a good system worked out, it took an hour. I was aware that the good folk at Wild Packs were keen to be back in the conference room, and wanted to miss as little as possible from the presentations they were actually there for.

As for nervousness. That’s simple. Be professional, respectful, and just plain nice. Sometimes, as with this shoot, photographers don’t have much time to get each sitter to relax. As a photographer, appearing nervous and stressed, or worse, standoffish, will make the job even harder. One of the common elements I always get in my feedback, is that I’m painless to work with and manage to put people at ease relatively quickly. This is a vastly underrated photography skill.

As an aside, for any other photographers reading this, I believe it’s essential that you put yourself in front of the lens on a regular basis. Only then can you understand your clients’ anxieties about standing in front of your camera. The “selfie” is a vital tool.

Organisation, flexibility and being human. These are the solutions to the key challenges in business and corporate portraiture.. It’s an extremely simple set of solutions, but it’s crazy how few bring them all together.

Hopefully, it shows. It was a great pleasure to work with the team at Wild Packs and especially Jamie, who was always huge fun and very approachable.

 

Creating a great first impression for your business is just one of my skills. If you want to find out more about what I do or contact me about my services you can find my contact details here.

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